Student Inquiry in the Research Process
Developing Lessons --
Developing Inquiry in Students & Teachers

 

Teacher will:

  • Prepare students with classroom discussion, lectures, etc. about curriculum topic and theme of inquiry.

  • Plan for opportunity for student presentation of product.

 

Library Media Specialist will:

  • Review with classes the Library Media Center rules and procedures.

  • Review the name, location, and use of basic resources. 

  • Review with classes what sources are good for specific reference tasks.

 

Teacher and Library Media Specialist will collaborate to:

  • Develop assessment strategies for educators and students to clearly understand expectations and outcomes.

  • Develop a list of possible primary sources within the community.

  • Develop mini-lessons to teach necessary library and information skills.  Mini-lessons should be taught as the need arises, instead of in an artificial environment.

  • Review research journals after each day in the Library Media Center and write individualized praise, encouragement, and suggestions on a regular basis.

  • Assist student in modifying their inquiries as research progresses.

  • Display final products throughout the Library Media Center and school.

 

Administrator will:

  • Support classroom teacher(s) and library media specialist throughout the collaborative planning, implementation, and evaluation process.

  • Actively engage students as they progress through the inquiry process in the Library Media Center.
     

Suggested Readings:

·        Callison, Daniel.  “Key Words in Instruction:  Collaboration,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XV, Number 5 (January 1999): 38-40.

·        Callison, Daniel.  “Key Words in Instruction:  Facilitator,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XIV, Number 6 (February 1998): 40-42.

 

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What do we hope to accomplish with this website?

  • Give educators (you) assistance in developing instruction into student inquiry units.

  • Give students a sense of ownership and get them more involved and committed during instruction and research.

  • Develop students into researchers instead of report writers.

 

Suggested Readings:

Gordon, Carol.  “Students as Authentic Researchers:  A New Prescription for the High School Research Assignment.”  School Library Media R, Volume 2, 1999.  May 30, 2001.  <http://www.ala.org/aasl/SLMR/vol2/authentic.html>

 

 

 

What will this do for your students?

  • Allow students the intellectual opportunity to select and specify a topic to investigate. 

  • Give students the opportunity to use a variety of traditional and non-traditional (see Primary Sources) resources, which allow for him/her to interpret, analyze and evaluate.

  • Offer a variety of options for project conclusions.  Include a peer evaluation aspect. 

  • Include a presentation component for a selected audience (fellow students, parents, community program, other educators) to help students develop oral presentation skills. 

  • Allow students to complete a self-evaluation, so that he/she can learn from his/her experience. 

"The ownership reverts to them [the students], it's no longer dependent on us [the educators]."
Lee Foerster, Library Media Specialist, Jefferson High School

 

Suggested Reading on student motivation:

·        Callison, Daniel.  “Key Words in Instruction:  Motivation,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XVI, Number 1 (September 1999): 37-39.

·        Callison, Daniel.  “Key Words in Instruction:  Creative Thinking,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XV, Number 4 (December 1998): 41-44, 47.

 ·        Muir, Mike, “Motivation Adolescents:  Play to Their

       Strengths,” Middle Ground (April 2000):  15-16.

 

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How to create successful student inquirers?

  • Educators should guide and coach students through the whole process (beginning through assessment).

  • Build the lesson from a students base knowledge.  If a student has no basic knowledge, he/she cannot succeed.  Stage 1

  • Keeping the students organized is fundamental.  All expectations, guidelines, requirements should be in writing and reviewed in class.  Use a research journal for optimum organization success and easier evaluation of the process. 

  • Teacher and Media Specialist become coach and role model.  You no longer have to lecture and tell the students what to do.  Instead you show by example and modeling, then give students feedback on their technique, just as a sports coach would.

  • Allow students to develop their own topic, questions and research strategy. 

  • Show students anonymous examples of good and bad work from a prior year/semester. 

  • Have students internalize their experience through daily reflections, annotated bibliography, and source notes. 

  • Have students develop an annotated bibliography that includes their research story in the annotation, as well as details about the source. 

  • Students should have an audience other than the teacher.  (Click here for simple ideas)

  • Allow for student success by offering final product options that meet most learning styles

 

Suggested Reading:

·       Kuhlthau, Carol C.  “Implementing a Process Approach to Information Literacy:  A Study Identifying Indicators of Success in Library Media Programs.”  School Library Media Quarterly, Volume 22, Number 1, Fall 1993.  June 6, 2001. 

<http://www.ala.org/aasl/SLMR/slmr_resources/select_kuhlthau1.html>.

·        Pappas, Marjorie L.  “Pathways to Inquiry,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XVI, Number 9 (May 2000): 23-27.

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References:

·        Brazee, Ed, “Collaborating on Curriculum:  Why it Matters, How it Work,” Middle Ground (August 2000):  33-37.

·        Callison, Daniel.  “Key Words in Instruction:  Inquiry,” School Library Media Activities Monthly, Volume XVI, Number 3 (November 1999): 38-39, 42, 45.

·        Callison, Daniel.  “School Library Media Programs & Free Inquiry Learning.”  School Library Journal  February 1986:  20-24.

·        Carey, James O.  “Library Skills, Information Skills, and Information Literacy:  Implications for Teaching and Learning.”  School Library Media Quarterly.  May 30, 2001.  <http://www.ala.org/SLMQ/skills.html>

·        Foerster, Lee.  Interview.  January 11, 2002.

·        Gordon, Carol.  “Students as Authentic Researchers:  A New Prescription for the High School Research Assignment.”  School Library Media R, Volume 2, 1999.  May 30, 2001.  <http://www.ala.org/aasl/SLMR/vol2/authentic.html>

·        Holland, Holly, “Reaching All Learners:  You’ve Got to Know Them To Show Them,” Middle Ground (April 2000):  10-13.

·        Kuhlthau, Carol C.  “Implementing a Process Approach to Information Literacy:  A Study Identifying Indicators of Success in Library Media Programs.”  School Library Media Quarterly, Volume 22, Number 1, Fall 1993.  June 6, 2001.  <http://www.ala.org/aasl/SLMR/slmr_resources/select_kuhlthau1.html>.

·        Loertscher, David V.  Taxonomies of the School Library Media Program, 2nd Edition.  San Jose, California:  Hi Willow Research & Publishing, 2000.

·        A Planning Guide for Information Power Building Partnerships for Learning:  with School Library Media Program Assessment Rubric for the 21st Century.  Chicago:  American Library Association, 1999.

·        Wolcott, Linda Lachance.  “Understanding How Teachers Plan:  Strategies for Successful Instructional Partnerships.”  School Library Media Quarterly, Volume 22, Number 3, Spring 1994.  June 5, 2001.  <http://www.ala.org/aasl/SLMR/slmr_resources/select_wolcott.html>.

 

·        Zemelman, Steven and Harvey Daniels and Arthur Hyde.  “Best Practice:  New Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s Schools.”  Portsmouth, NH:  Heineman, 1998.

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Buy the Book that Received Starred Reviews:
The Blue Book on Information Age Inquiry, Instruction, and Literacy (Libraries Unlimited, 2006) by Dr. Daniel Callison - click here to order!

Permission granted for the non-commercial duplication and use of this website and resources contained therein
for K-12 classroom/educational use only, provided it is substantially unchanged from its present form, appropriate credit is given, and written permission is granted. To request permission to use this website or materials contained within, please contact Leslie Preddy.
All other rights reserved.

 

Model developed by Leslie Preddy, Library Media Specialist

with a grant from the

Indiana Department of Education-Office of Learning Resources
 

"Student Inquiry in the Research Process" developed based on the elements of

Information Inquiry designed by Dr. Daniel Callison, Indiana University and

LMS Associates, publishers of School Library Media Activities Monthly

 

 S.I.R.P. developed in 2001                               
 Website created in 2002

 Last Update: May 1, 2013

 

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